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Radiation sickness

Overview Radiation sickness is damage to your body caused by a large dose of radiation often received over a short period of time (acute). The amount of radiation absorbed by the body — the absorbed dose — determines how sick you'll be. Radiation sickness is also called acute radiation syndrome or radiation poisoning. Radiation sickness is not caused by common imaging tests that use low-dose radiation, such as X-rays or CT scans. Although radiation sickness is serious and often fatal, it's rare. Since the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, during World War II, most cases of radiation sickness have occurred after nuclear industrial accidents, such as the 1986 explosion and fire that damaged the nuclear power plant at Chernobyl, Ukraine. Symptoms The severity of signs and symptoms of radiation sickness depends on how much radiation you've absorbed. How much you absorb depends on the strength of the radiated energy, the time of your exposures, and the distance b
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Acute lymphocytic leukemia

Overview Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow — the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are made. The word "acute" in acute lymphocytic leukemia comes from the fact that the disease progresses rapidly and creates immature blood cells, rather than mature ones. The word "lymphocytic" in acute lymphocytic leukemia refers to the white blood cells called lymphocytes, which  ALL  affects. Acute lymphocytic leukemia is also known as acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Acute lymphocytic leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children, and treatments result in a good chance for a cure. Acute lymphocytic leukemia can also occur in adults, though the chance of a cure is greatly reduced. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of acute lymphocytic leukemia may include: Bleeding from the gums Bone pain Fever Frequent infections Frequent or severe nosebleeds Lumps caused by swollen lymph nodes in and around the neck, armpits, abdomen or

Acute liver failure

Overview Acute liver failure is loss of liver function that occurs rapidly — in days or weeks — usually in a person who has no preexisting liver disease. It's most commonly caused by a hepatitis virus or drugs, such as acetaminophen. Acute liver failure is less common than chronic liver failure, which develops more slowly. Acute liver failure, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, can cause serious complications, including excessive bleeding and increasing pressure in the brain. It's a medical emergency that requires hospitalization. Depending on the cause, acute liver failure can sometimes be reversed with treatment. In many situations, though, a liver transplant may be the only cure. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of acute liver failure may include: Yellowing of your skin and eyeballs (jaundice) Pain in your upper right abdomen Abdominal swelling (ascites) Nausea Vomiting A general sense of feeling unwell (malaise) Disorientation or confusion Sleepiness Breath may have a must

Acute kidney failure

Overview Acute kidney failure occurs when your kidneys suddenly become unable to filter waste products from your blood. When your kidneys lose their filtering ability, dangerous levels of wastes may accumulate, and your blood's chemical makeup may get out of balance. Acute kidney failure — also called acute renal failure or acute kidney injury — develops rapidly, usually in less than a few days. Acute kidney failure is most common in people who are already hospitalized, particularly in critically ill people who need intensive care. Acute kidney failure can be fatal and requires intensive treatment. However, acute kidney failure may be reversible. If you're otherwise in good health, you may recover normal or nearly normal kidney function. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of acute kidney failure may include: Decreased urine output, although occasionally urine output remains normal Fluid retention, causing swelling in your legs, ankles or feet Shortness of breath Fatigue Confusion Naus

Guillain-Barre syndrome

Overview Guillain-Barre (gee-YAH-buh-RAY) syndrome is a rare disorder in which your body's immune system attacks your nerves. Weakness and tingling in your extremities are usually the first symptoms. These sensations can quickly spread, eventually paralyzing your whole body. In its most severe form Guillain-Barre syndrome is a medical emergency. Most people with the condition must be hospitalized to receive treatment. The exact cause of Guillain-Barre syndrome is unknown. But two-thirds of patients report symptoms of an infection in the six weeks preceding. These include respiratory or a gastrointestinal infection or Zika virus. There's no known cure for Guillain-Barre syndrome, but several treatments can ease symptoms and reduce the duration of the illness. Although most people recover from Guillain-Barre syndrome, the mortality rate is 4% to 7%. Between 60-80% of people are able to walk at six months. Patients may experience lingering effects from it, such as weakness, numbne

Acute myelogenous leukemia

Overview Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow — the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are made. The word "acute" in acute myelogenous leukemia denotes the disease's rapid progression. It's called myelogenous (my-uh-LOHJ-uh-nus) leukemia because it affects a group of white blood cells called the myeloid cells, which normally develop into the various types of mature blood cells, such as red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Acute myelogenous leukemia is also known as acute myeloid leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia, acute granulocytic leukemia and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Symptoms General signs and symptoms of the early stages of acute myelogenous leukemia may mimic those of the flu or other common diseases. Signs and symptoms of acute myelogenous leukemia include: Fever Bone pain Lethargy and fatigue Shortness of breath Pale skin Frequent infections Easy bruising Unusual bleeding, such as frequent nos

Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM)

Overview Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a rare but serious condition that affects the spinal cord. It can cause sudden weakness in the arms or legs, loss of muscle tone, and loss of reflexes. The condition mainly affects young children. Most children have a mild respiratory illness or fever caused by a viral infection about one to four weeks before developing symptoms of acute flaccid myelitis. If you or your child develops symptoms of acute flaccid myelitis, seek immediate medical care. Symptoms can progress rapidly. Hospitalization is needed and sometimes a ventilator is required for breathing support. Since experts began tracking acute flaccid myelitis following initial clusters in 2014, outbreaks in the United States have occurred in 2016 and 2018. Outbreaks tend to occur between August and November. Symptoms The most common signs and symptoms of acute flaccid myelitis include: Sudden arm or leg weakness Sudden loss of muscle tone Sudden loss of reflexes Other possible signs and s